How Your Weight May Affect Your Risk of Breast Cancer By Dana Humes-Goff

We now have substantial evidence that overweight/obesity is strongly associated with breast cancer, and with poorer prognosis and increased mortality, especially in postmenopausal women. In fact, women over 50 who are obese have a 20% to 40% increased risk of developing breast cancer compared to normal-weight women.

A quick calculation based on U.S. Census Bureau data indicates that there are about 45 million women in the United States between the ages of 45 and 75 years, and it is estimated that 40% of them are obese. These findings are a strong motivator for two-thirds of American women to consider changing their lifestyles to reduce their risks.

It’s never too late to embrace a healthy lifestyle change. A recently published, large prospective study evaluated 180,000 women, 50 years of age and older, over the course of 18 years and found that even a modest weight loss was found to reduce breast cancer risk. An over-accumulation of fat cells raises breast cancer risk by increasing the body’s estrogen levels. Women who are overweight also tend to have higher levels of insulin, and higher insulin levels have also been linked to breast cancer.

A healthy diet and a consistent exercise routine can help reduce breast cancer risk by 20-80%. That’s huge! And, losing even a small amount of weight can make a difference in your risk—not to mention your overall health. Without a doubt, even losing a small amount can be a big challenge. That’s why the Couri Center has an integrated health care program to address this critical issue. Our providers and our registered dietitian offer a team approach to a healthy diet, nutrition, food sensitivities, and exercise; thus, combining conventional medicine with functional medicine to provide care specific to your individual needs.

To get started, call 309-692-6838 or email and let us assist you in reducing your risk.

January 2020: The Girlfriend’s Guide to an Integrative Lifestyle

 

Girlfriend's Guide to integrative health event 2019

Free January Event: The Girlfriend’s Guide to an Integrative Lifestyle

Girlfriend, are you ready for a change?

What IS an integrative lifestyle anyway?  Why is it so vital to weight loss and optimal health?

Join us for a casual, FREE Q & A interview with Dr. Couri & our team of providers!  Couri Center’s Registered Dietitian, Leslie Rusch-Bayer, and our Couri Center providers for an open discussion on how food sensitivities, hormones & our personalized lifestyle programs have helped women lose weight, reduce medications, & restore health!  We’ll give you all the tools you need to achieve your wellness goals! From in-depth labs to personalized nutrition & fitness, we’ll guide you to feeling great again!

Invite your girlfriends.  RSVP today!

 

 

Read Leslie Rusch-Bayer’s latest article: A Team approach to Weight Loss

A Team Approach to Weight Loss By Leslie Rusch-Bayer

Weight loss and obesity continue to be problems for women. Even though women have many concerns regarding health, we tend to rationalize negative symptoms as ‘normal’ due to lack of time, cost, concern, and knowledge. It is becoming more common to blame age or family history for new problems, instead of looking to see how lifestyle modifications may improve or correct health, symptoms, and labs. Diets, medications, and even surgery have been considered when trying to solve the obesity epidemic; however, these options are only helping temporarily. Even if weight is lost, most people struggle with regaining weight.

In 2013 the American Heart Association (AHA) created guidelines for weight management for overweight and obesity in adults. Standards of practice were created to help document which type of programs produced the best results. The GOLD standard is an on-site, long-term, comprehensive lifestyle program run by trained and certified professionals. These programs should be longer in duration, six to twelve months, and include laboratory testing, diet, physical activity, and behavior modification. The typical outcome for this type of program is a 5-10% weight loss.

Programs directed by primary care offices, gyms, and weight loss facilities–unlike those directed in conjunction with a registered dietitian–have shown in research to be ineffective, especially long term. Because these programs fail to provide proper education, personalized dietary recommendations, and lifestyle guidance, they leave their patients at a high risk of regaining weight. Over a four-year period, patients who completed a comprehensive lifestyle program maintained a 3.6% greater weight loss than patients who only made dietary changes. Web-based and accountability-style programs should only be used in conjunction with a comprehensive program if needed or necessary